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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
debt? a question i thought was rather significant. >> the word fiscal cliff was never mentioned by candidates or one of the moderators in the debates. every day, we have a countdown. we already elected the guy. it has to be dealt with on its own level by its own party. it is not part of solving the deficit by hitting social security and hurting seniors. it sits by its side. finally, it seems to me and my goofy attitude about life around here, that the sad part -- when you have leaders of both parties throwing out, casting out into the water the bait that says, maybe it would help the democrats if we go off the cliff. the other side, maybe it will help the republicans if we go off the cliff. i will tell you, that is like betting your country. anybody who has that attitude, they are really missing the boat. any government representative that does not realize he or she is an american first, instead of a guy raking it in and sticking the tax code which goes only 20% of the american people, then you have a real problem in america. as long as we are in the throne of grover norquist. >
turn to the rest. >> right now we are facing a fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling. before that, we were looking at several potential government shutdowns. at a different level, the appropriations process has not worked as intended for years. neither has the budget process. it seems like abnormal is the normal. that type of activity in this situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential showdown, as he suggested, with the next debt ceiling altercation, this creates uncertainty, which is not good for the private sector and certainly is not good for the federal government in terms of its ability to function in a normal way. how can congress break out of this? >> do what we are hired to do and to appropriations in a timely manner. in maryland, we have a lot of defense contractors very concerned about sequester. many of them say, warner, warner, a nuisance and-bowles. -- do simpson-bowles. everyone supports it, but no one has read it. but the top line numbers are almost the same -- next time you do a default, do not make it so awful. putting a gun to
up getting past this fiscal cliff by creating another one with the debt ceiling. the best way out -- we passed a bill yesterday on the floor, it passed 98-0. that does not make news. it came out of committee -- a defense authorization bill. you had a majority and minority that work together. all kinds of amendments that were agreed to and voted on. and it passed. that is what we have not been doing. we have had bills come out of both leader offices, airdrop on the floor, that are intended not to pass but to show differences. if we can just go through regular order, things would be just fine. >> they have regular order in the house. >> regular order in the house has not brought compromise. i would like to see things go to regular order. i am a big proponent of allowing them to work -- we do need to recognize that in the era of divided government, where you have one party in control of the white house and another in control of the house, you are going to have a lot of give and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. if you go through the last campaign, it is not that bi
-called fiscal cliff. the president has set a goal. $4 trillion in debt reduction over the next decade. are there any specific ways of reaching that figure that both of you might agree on? >> well, you know, one compromise i can agree with democrats on, we need to cut military spending. so i think the compromise is conservatives like myself who think national defense is very important should compromise on military spending and liberals should compromise on entitlements and social welfare spending, that compromise should get to spending cuts. >> here is the question, though. both sides are going to have to compromise, beyond defense spending, any other compromise you could see you supporting? >> mostly has to be to me on the spending side. we used to spend about 20% of gdp. now spending 25% of gdp. federal spending has gone up at an alarming rate in the last four years. people come to me and said say we have to raise taxes on rich people. one there, is not enough money. two, when you raise rates, you get less revenue. sometimes you find when you lower rates, you get more revenue. >> wha
.m. eastern on c-span. >> the authors of the simpson- bowles debt reduction plan talk about the fiscal cliff and choices facing congress. both alan simpson and erskine bowles have emphasized the need for revenue increases and entitlement reform. they have urged congress to reach a compromise. this is hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> here we go. our guest this morning are erskine bowles and senator alan simpson, a co-chairman of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform and co-founders of the campaign to fix the debt or as the new york times called them this morning, the debt duo. their last joint appearance with us was in november of 2010. let me thank them both for a much for coming back. we're all trying to fix the nation's fiscal woes. erskine bowles is president the university of north carolina. he also had a career in investment banking and venture capital. the team in washington in 1993 service director of the small business administration and was later mentioned -- named chief of staff to president alan simpson clintonala followed his father's footsteps
negotiations over the debt ceiling fell apart. to understand what's going on during the hopeless fiscal cliff negotiations rewind to 2011 when boehner and president obama came within inches of a grand bargain, a deal that would have forced both democrats and republicans to eat their vegetables. in its comprehensive analysis of what happens during the secret negotiations, matt bai wrote -- the deal unraveled in large part because speaker boehner could not get his unruly caucus to go along with raising new revenue. fast forward to this year and republicans now think that deal, the one they walked away from, sounds pretty good. they're using it as a basis for their current proposal. only problem. boehner had his chance. president obama now thinks he has the upper hand. according to the "washington post's" ezra klein, quote -- >> joining us now representative chris van hollen of maryland, ranking member of the house budget committee. great to have you on the program. >> great to be with you, alex. >> let's talk a little bit about 2011 versus 2012, which is to say, the republican party is a very d
guest, fran dresher, on say anything! >> eliot: hidden among all this talk of the fiscal cliff-austerity bomb being covered in horrendous and tedious detail by every cable station is a potentially more dangerous accounting deadline. the debt ceiling. and yes this is deja vu all over again. but i have a solution for president obama this time around. mr. president, turn the tables on him speaker boehner that is. we all recall the trap that the white house fell into last year, letting negotiations over the potential government shutdown be concluded only to be held hostage again when the republicans then refused to raise the debt ceiling without getting additional concessions. it was, as congressman welch said it was professional malpractice not to wrap the debt ceiling into the first round of negotiations. so don't do it again. the debt ceiling will necessarily and inevitably be hit and breached early next year. yet when president obama told speaker boehner at their november 16th meeting to raise the ceiling by year's end boehner said there is a price for everything. no, there doe
to this debt crisis, the so-called fiscal cliff, could bring about the sequestration that is the slicing of the military right in half. that would be a disaster in many respects. across the world people would see we can't handle our own country well, our own defense well. people across the world would see us failing to fulfill the duty of the constitution to provide for the national defense that's up to congress to do that. but after we get this done -- and let's hope that it does come to pass -- a second challenge is out there, and that's the challenge to glue together a strategy that will keep this country safe and secure. back in the 1947 era george key man sent what's known as the long telegram from moscow to the white house spelling out the rise of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman, my fellow missourian, and his staff glued together the containment strategy which stayed in effect through admiral -- excuse me, through general eisenhower's presidency and later until, as you know, the wall in berlin came tumbling down, and the soviet union imploded on itself. the st
characterized this fight over the fiscal cliff but alan simpson managed to do it with a video promoting had is campaign to fix the debt. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your problems and getting on youtube so you can see gangnam style. ♪ and start using those precious social media skills to go out and sign people up on this baby, three people a week, let it grow, and don't forget take part or get taken apart. by these old ones will clean out the treasury before you get there. ♪ >> [ inaudible ]. >> the lasso again and then the horseback. horse horse. the cowboys ride. >> it made my day. i had to share it with you. chris cizilla an msnbc contributor and managing editor of post politics.com and susan page, washington bureau chief for "usa today." hello. alan simpson never fails. >> i was instagraming, andrea. i was busy instagraming. >> chris, maybe this do broke through. put him on the road, have him go door to door. >> my favorite part of the video which i have watched approximately 1,000 times is when he says at the end, so another lasso then. >> and he is a man who k
and work with both parties to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a manner that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs is a great way for the president to start his second term. and for the good of our country, and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, couple things. first, on the issue of tax rates, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in those top tax rates? and i'm also wondering what our final deadline is on this? when do we really have to have a deal? >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table, but revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deductions, and not raising rates. we think it's better for the economy. pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together, and to resolve this. and frankly, sooner is better than later. >
to our website for more details. washington insiders tackle fiscal cliff policy solutions. the group will hold a roundtable discussion today on the importance of reform to address the nation's debt and deficit spending this event takes place this morning around 8:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for all our coverage of the fiscal cliff talks. we have a web site set up so you can follow along on our special page for these fiscal cliff talks. back to your phone calls. good morning, doris. caller: good morning. the plan that the republicans offered, this is just the romney-ryan plan that the american voters said no to. other than destroying our earned benefit, i do not call them entitlements because we worked hard and we earned them. there are no specifics. what loopholes will they close? of course, they are going to punish the poor and middle- class. their plan still gives another huge tax cut to the 1%. people need to look at what happened to this country between fdr and nixon. look at what happened with the conservative takeover from nixon until now. host: we are going to have
's something that won't happen. short term spending cuts should be part of any fiscal cliff deal. the big news this morning is we're not going over the cliff. they have a bad hand. they're going to end up passing this middle class tax thing if that's the only thing they do. and live to fight another day. you can see the momentum building. not official but you see it. the difficulty for boehner still is passing the extension may be best of the options it is an option that a chunk of his party has said he would reject. the fiscal conservatives criticizing boehner's budget pr proposal. then you had senate republicans watching their backs, rejecting a u.n. treaty that bans discrimination against those with disabilities around the world. senator jim demint said speaker boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs. yes, he said speaker boehner. one party proposes increase in an effort to counter them. the other party's leadership proposes, wait for it, $800 billion in tax increases and then former alaska governor sarah palin blasting boehner's decision to remove some conservatives from
an agreement have to be part of the agreement to divert the fiscal cliff? >> we're not going to negotiate over what is a fundamental responsibility of congress, which is to pay the bills that congress incurred. it should be part of the deal. it should be done. it should be done without drama. we cannot allow our economy to be held hostage again to the whims of an ideological agenda. it's -- we are the united states of america. we are the greatest economy on earth. we pay our bills. we always have. you know, if congress wants to reduce spending, that should be part of the negotiations that go into making decisions about how we spend, you know, the programs we spend money on, and the president's very interested in reducing spending and reducing our deficits, but you don't default on the economy. that is -- we saw -- >> [inaudible] >> yes. we saw what happened in 2011, and it's unacceptable. >> did the president have to chance to speak to republicans last night at the reception here about the fiscal cliff? >> i won't read out conversations. the president and first lady met with scores and scores
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernible] >> i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we ar
given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker. this tax hike will hurt small businesses which provide 67% of the jobs in this country. that may fund the government for a short time. then, what's the plan? stimulus 2.0. because the first stimulus worked so well? that was a disaster as well. we have a $16 trillion deficit, and the president wants to spend more money. are you kidding me? spending is the problem. we don't need more of it. lastly, he wants the power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. the administration cannot issue an edict like a money monarchy. congress, congress, congress is in control of the purse. we have gone wild and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? mr. quigley: i ask unanimous consent to address the house
think the president understands what needs to be done to not only take care of the fiscal cliff but also take care of the concerns of the job creators, you know, make sure that the economy not only -- not only that we move towards a more balanced approach towards solving the debt but also that we grow the economy? did he seem to get that yesterday? >> yeah, i think without a doubt, he understood that the fiscal cliff issue was just short term in nature. it's something that needed to get moved on. but the bigger issue was still tax reform for business, making sure that businesses could be globally competitive, dealing with the immigration issues and s.t.e.m. and moving on with regulation because ultimately he did ak knowledge that it is the business community that creates jobs, and jobs are the path to growth, and growth is the path to more revenue. absolutely. >> let's go to pulitzer prize winner, jonathan capehart. jonathan, i tell you what, pieae is breaking out all over the place, howard dean admitted that we had to cut medicare. michael steele admitted we had to raise taxes. and you
for joining us this morning. we appreciate it. >>> 33 days until the fiscal cliff. we just keep talking about this. while politicians try to sell their plans of first big negotiations get under way with treasury secretary tim geithner headed to capitol hill for separate meetings with congressional leaders. we'll have much more on "starting point" as well. >> and best advice before we go, too. don't go away. ♪ ♪ make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. with scottrader streaming quot
it fiscal cliff at the end of the year because we are near a debt crisis. driven by too much spending. everyone was the focus on how can raise taxes. we should be focused on how to get spending under control. we have a spending problem. we should be focused on what really matters. the debt crisis means the economy collapses, we have people out of work. it means we do not have money to pay for basic benefits for medicare and social security. it is important to talk about deductions and tax policies in terms of tax reform. john vader opened the door for that. president obama has in it -- john boehner opened the door for that. president obama has indicated no intention of looking at -- . host: what deductions would you host: what deductions would you put on the table? guest: tax reform is not to raise revenue. is to make the tax code less of a drag on the economy. we do that by lowering tax rates and getting rid of some deductions, exemptions, credits. but we do not do it to raise revenue. host: chuck marra, how important our deductions? guest: they are very important. if you get into th
have no idea how we're going to pay for them. we have a fiscal cliff which we describe now that everybody's talking about at the end of this year, that's not the cliff. the cliff is the unsustainable debt we have. and unless, in my estimation, a lot of economists, you're not going to put us on a path to prosperity unless you take about $9 trillion out over the next ten years. and we're barely talking $4 trillion. >> yeah, nobody's talking $9 trillion. >> yeah. and $9 trillion is the only thing that actually solves this. so we're sitting here as a country, we have made commitments that have to be rearranged and made more efficient. we have a tax structure that is subpar to what we need for our economy in terms of our historical averages. and nobody's talking long run. everybody's talking december 31st. >> i know. you see john boehner's proposal, he was very critical of the president's proposaproposal, it nonstarter, but boehner comes out talking cutting $2.2 trillion. you talk about $9 trillion needed over the next ten years. look at the past four years. we've almost added $
a budget deal. the fiscal cliff has come about because of happenstance. we have a series of events that were designed to happen. we have other things that are going to happen that are not necessarily intended. debt going to hit the ceiling again very shortly after the first of the year. that is something at happens when it happens. host: one piece you alluded to with entitlements is the simpson-bowles would raise the social security retirement age. explain where it would go. guest: it would raise the retirement age. right now it is scheduled to go up to 67. that was a deal reached in the 1980's to keep social security solvent. we are living longer. or social security was first created, the retirement age was 65. life expectancy was 64. now we're talking life expectancy of around 80. what this does is raising up and indexes s list. in 2075, the benefits will start being paid out. when you're 69, there are 67. like expectancy will grow at a faster rate. some argue this is still a cut because it is changing from current law. others argue it is not a change. host: which he agreed to re
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)